Headline »

Military Drawdown Overseas Means More Veterans Struggle to Find Work at Home

By | September 25, 2016
archive-9-25-army

As the military drawdown in Afghanistan continues, the United States added an additional 80,000 veterans from the Army alone to the civilian workforce in 2015. This is on top of the normal annual rate of separations from military service. Let’s think about all America’s soldiers who are receiving pink slips.
The military trains and employs more young Americans than any other single institution. They receive …

Read the full story »

Headline »

Military Drawdown Overseas Means More Veterans Struggle to Find Work at Home

By | September 25, 2016
archive-9-25-army

As the military drawdown in Afghanistan continues, the United States added an additional 80,000 veterans from the Army alone to the civilian workforce in 2015. This is on top of the normal annual rate of separations from military service. Let’s think about all America’s soldiers who are receiving pink slips.
The military trains and employs more young Americans than any other single institution. They receive …

Headline »

How a Single Gunman Shook Canada’s Culture of Openness

By | September 24, 2016
Royal Canadian Mounted Police officers stand guard on Parliament Hill in Ottawa

In October of 2014, I was sitting in a Starbucks not far from work texting my boss back and fourth about the upcoming Christmas season. I work as the Music Director in a church, so those conversations become intense in early fall.
I had Twitter open and noticed something about a shooting and our War Memorial. At first glance, I didn’t think much of it. Lately, …

Featured »

waiting for the wave/ working with my board #poem

By | September 23, 2016
poem-9-23

The wave a moving gray ridge
curve from the gray horizon and
pelicans, gray too, glide just
over its forward slope sight I
never tire of from the water
I am waiting for the wave
working with my board will
take my weight from me for some
seconds to forget it and then
part of the deal give it back.
 
Chris Davidson‘s poems have most recently shown up in Miramar, The Ear, and the anthology …

Featured »

As a Comedian Who Teaches Diversity and Inclusion, I Think P.C. Culture Has Gone Too Far

By | September 23, 2016
foster-on-humor-lead

I have loved the art of stand-up comedy for as long as I can remember. I loved everything about it. The boldness. The nerve. The clever play on words. The astute observations it took to find a kernel of humor in even the most mundane of situations. I still believe that comedians are some of the smartest people on this planet.
Who else could take …

Headline »

In Order to Regulate Nanomaterial, First We Need to Agree on a Definition

By | September 23, 2016
Nanomaterial - Gewebe

How do you regulate something you cannot define? It’s a dilemma that policymakers around the world are struggling with as they try to enact regulations for nanomaterials—that loosely defined group of very small particles with very large implications and applications for everything from self-cleaning windows and mirrors, to better renewable energy materials, to more precise and effective cancer treatments. Yet, the same properties of nanomaterials …

Featured »

In California, Weakening Diversity Leaves Us More Vulnerable to All Kinds of Disasters

By | September 22, 2016
Blue Cut wildfire

Californians like to brag about our diversity, how our mix of people of all races, ethnicities, and origins produces a vital culture and economy. But we rarely talk about the other less glamorous role diversity plays in our state—as protection against disasters, both natural and manmade.
California is a disaster-prone state, and when calamity strikes, diversity—of all kinds—keeps bad times from becoming even worse.
The central …

Featured »

How the Seemingly Xenophobic Jokes Europeans Tell About Each Other Bring Them Together

By | September 22, 2016
seignovert_lead-e1474052001578

To understand Europe’s humor is to understand its history; satire and politics have long gone hand in hand. Whether in drawings, ballads, or prose, humor has long provided a counterbalance and provocation to the political consensus of the Old Continent. Etiquette—that complex network of courtly conventions that we might today call political correctness—may have played a significant role in regulating people’s behaviors and social interactions. …

Headline, What It Means to Be American »

More Than 30 Years After Production Ceased, the Train Caboose Still Captivates Americans

By | September 22, 2016
image-1-caboose_lead_cropped

Americans have many icons. But those dealing with the exploration and expansion of the United States seem especially beloved: stagecoaches, steamboats, trains—and the railroad caboose. From the mid-19th century through the last decade of the 20th century, the “little red caboose behind the train” has had iconic qualities similar to the little red schoolhouse, being the subject of songs, books, and toys that remain popular …

Featured »

How the Marginalized Invented Offensive Comedy in Modern America

By | September 21, 2016

“Sometimes you feel guilty laughing at some of Lenny’s mordant jabs,” journalist Herb Caen once said of the taboo-shattering comic Lenny Bruce. “But that disappears a second later when your inner voice tells you, with pleased surprise, ‘But that’s true.’”
The it’s-ok-to-say-it-if-it’s-true defense of politically incorrect comedy may be a simplistic one. But it’s a defense that has prevailed for a reason: It’s made for …

Featured »

How California’s First New Public Medical School in 40 Years Trains Its Doctors

By | September 21, 2016
archive-9-21-riverside

The United States spends more money on healthcare than any other country in the world. So how does Costa Rica outperform the United States in every measure of health of its population?
Costa Rica is healthier because its government spends more money than ours does on prevention and wellness.
In our country, we have left vast segments of the population without affordable care and we do not …

BROUGHT TO YOU BY