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Today’s Coyotes Are the Ultimate Urban Hipsters

By | August 29, 2016
Flores on coyotes LEAD

Everyone in America has a coyote story. Or if you don’t, give it time. You will.
The tawny, golden-eyed, sharp-nosed wild dog of the American deserts is now our backyard predator, everywhere from Miami to Toronto and San Diego to Seattle.
The stories are already piling up. During a heat wave, in broad daylight, a coyote strolls into a Quiznos sandwich shop in Chicago and …

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The Lightning-Speed Evolution of Online Speech Norms Is Bearing Down on Twitter

By | August 29, 2016
Leslie Jones

Earlier this month, Twitter announced that it would be using new tools to curb hate speech and harassment on its site. The news came on the heels of a tell-all report on BuzzFeed that chronicled how 10 years of dogmatic commitment to “free speech” combined with persistent mismanagement led to the popular social media app becoming “a honeypot for assholes.” Twitter’s former head of …

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What Kind of Camera Does a LACMA Photography Curator Own?

By | August 29, 2016
Brit Salvesen by Aaron Salcido copy

Britt Salvesen is curator and head of the Wallis Annenberg Photography Department and the Prints & Drawings Department at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Before joining a Zócalo/Getty “Open Art” panel discussion entitled “What Did Robert Mapplethorpe Teach Us?” she talked in the Zócalo green room about surfing, podcasts, and time travel.
 
Q: I’ve heard that you’re a bike rider. What’s your favorite …

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Today’s Coyotes Are the Ultimate Urban Hipsters

By | August 29, 2016
Flores on coyotes LEAD

Everyone in America has a coyote story. Or if you don’t, give it time. You will.
The tawny, golden-eyed, sharp-nosed wild dog of the American deserts is now our backyard predator, everywhere from Miami to Toronto and San Diego to Seattle.
The stories are already piling up. During a heat wave, in broad daylight, a coyote strolls into a Quiznos sandwich shop in Chicago and …

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Why Yale Art Critic Jonathan Weinberg Finds Himself Painting Surfers

By | August 28, 2016
ITGR Jonathan Weinberg by Aaron Salcido copy

Jonathan Weinberg is a painter, art historian, and author of Male Desire: The Homoerotic in American Art. Before joining a Zócalo/Getty “Open Art” panel discussion entitled “What Did Robert Mapplethorpe Teach Us?” he talked in the Zócalo green room about Maurice Sendak, X-Ray vision, and the appeal of painting surfers.
 
Q: What is your first memory of painting?
A: I don’t have a memory of painting, but …

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Who Can Make Campaign Finance Reform a Reality? UC Irvine’s Rick Hasen Says Journalists

By | August 27, 2016
ITGR Richard Hasen by Aaron Salcido

Richard L. Hasen is the Chancellor’s Professor of Law and Political Science at the University of California, Irvine, and the author of Plutocrats United: Campaign Money, the Supreme Court, and the Distortion of American Elections. Before giving a lecture at Zócalo on the effects of loose campaign finance laws on American politics, he talked in the Zócalo green room about idolizing Jimmy Carter, podcasting, and …

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though barely, I may be/ disappearing #poem

By | August 26, 2016
Poem 8-26 LEAD

In a room of gold, I am
smoking.
The parade of beautiful
boys and women
have long since gone.
Along with the letters
and packets
of photographs.
Yesterday
G. read my cards:
tarot, through the white, pink
static of the television set.
Child, he said,
you are a bone.
You must leave
everything,
burn it all down
to the ground.
In the Polish black and white film
I sit inside the parked white sedan,
disguised as …

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Ed Ruscha’s 50-Year Journey Through the Wild West

By | August 26, 2016
A337253

In 1956, at the age of 18, Edward Joseph Ruscha IV left his home in Oklahoma and drove a 1950 Ford sedan to Los Angeles, where he hoped to attend art school. His trip roughly followed the fabled Route 66 through the Southwest, and featured many of the sights—auto repair shops, billboards, and long stretches of roadway punctuated by oil derricks and telephone poles—that would …

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U.S. Presidents of Both Parties Resort to Orwellian Rhetoric When War’s Involved

By | August 26, 2016
George W. Bush

An essential goal of American presidential rhetoric is to keep the public thinking the nation is constantly under threat, and thus reliably deferential to their ostensibly protective government.
You can see that war footing—and the appeal for deference—in the open-ended “war on terror,” declared by President George W. Bush in 2001 and continued by President Barack Obama under less grandiose rhetoric. That notion that we’re …

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American Liberals Have Agonized Over Guns, Butter, and Civil Liberties Since FDR

By | August 25, 2016
Tony Garcci

Ever since the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, Americans have faced a set of seemingly unprecedented national security challenges and anxieties. Our society has been consumed with debates about government surveillance programs, overseas counter-terrorism campaigns, border security, and extreme proposals to bar foreign Muslims from America—debates that are all, at bottom, focused on finding the proper balance between keeping people safe versus protecting civil …

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she said to me she was built for the West #poem

By | August 25, 2016
Picture 004

I am in a eucalyptus grove next to a playground. I am seven, or eight, my school is Catholic, and recess begins and ends with a bell that stings. You feel it in your whole body. The bell can be heard from a distance, as I have been told by one boy, who has found the fence past the grove we’re in and past the …

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